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Black, Unwashed, Poppy Seeds

Burma Spice’s Dutch black poppy seeds – which are actually bluish grey, brown or black – are revered for their nutty and sweet aroma. Baking, roasting or toasting the seeds unlocks this sweet flavor, making it an ideal companion in confections and creamy sauces.

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Description

Black Poppy Seeds: Flavor Profile

Poppy seeds have been a popular food source since the Bronze Ages, and the tiny, nutty-flavored seed has many uses in the kitchen. Poppy seeds are great in salad dressings, in breads and cakes, and the seed pairs perfectly with lemon and citrus.

Dutch black poppy seeds – which are actually bluish grey, brown or black – are revered for their nutty and sweet aroma. Baking, roasting or toasting the seeds unlocks this sweet flavor, making it an ideal companion in confections and creamy sauces.

Poppy Seeds: Common Uses 

Poppy seeds have been used in European, Asian and Middle Eastern cooking for thousands of years. And the versatile seeds have many uses in cooking.

  • Baked Goods – Poppy seeds complement just about any baked good, although most common they’re sprinkled on bagels, breads and pretzels.
  • Cakes and Confections – The seeds’ natural sweetness complements any sugary cake. Poppy seed muffins are a favorite in the U.S., as are sweet poppy seed breads and cookies.
  • Savory Dishes – In Middle Eastern cooking, poppy seeds are a favorite addition to curries, chutneys and to garnish roasted vegetables.
  • Thickening Agent – In northern India, the seeds are often ground and added to soups and sauces as a thickener.

Black Poppy Seeds: Cultivation

Poppy seeds have been grown around the world for thousands of years, and there are many varieties, including the opium poppy. The Dutch blue poppy and European-grown varieties are the most popular in cooking, and they contain very little opium. The poppy seed continues to be widely used in Central European cooking, and poppy seed oil is produced there as well.

The poppy is a beautiful pink or purple flower that grows up to five feet tall. And the flower produces a small pod that contains the tiny, kidney-shaped seeds. The seeds are miniscule; 1 million seeds weigh just 1 pound.

The culinary poppy plant is primarily grown in Romania, India and the Netherlands, and the plant has been cultivated for its seeds since the Bronze Age.

History of Black Poppy Seeds

Poppies have been grown for thousands of years. In fact, they appeared in ancient Sumer in Mesopotamia (the Sumerian symbol for poppy was hul, which means “joy.” In Europe, poppy seeds are in the fossil record as early as 4,000 years ago, as poppy seed muffins and cakes were found in ancient Swiss lake dwellings.

Poppies spread through the ancient world into China in the fourth century, and the Chinese and Arabs both noted the medicinal uses of the poppy plant. The Chinese were the first to use it in preparation for major surgeries. Throughout the Bronze Age and into early modern periods, poppies proliferated around the world, from China to the Netherlands. And the Dutch were one of the first countries to commercialize poppy growing.

Today, the Netherlands is one of the largest producers of blue (or black) poppy seeds. In the spring, it’s hard to miss the colorful fields of poppies, which are abundant around Amsterdam and along the coasts.

About Our Black Poppy Seeds

We source our poppy seeds from Holland, one of world’s largest producers of culinary poppies. Dutch-grown poppies produce a naturally nutty and sweet seed, and they’re top quality. Our Dutch black poppy seeds are A1 Grade, the highest designation.

Additional information

Weight0.4 oz
Dimensions3 × 4 × 5 in
Size

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